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Re: filmscanners: Cleaning slides



Hope this is not off-topic to continue this discussion re "Best way to clean
slides", but I have found it worthwhile to learn of the methods others use.

I have found most of my problems arise when I put slides into competitions
or when I project them for others. They seem to attract dust and gunk that
must be sucked in somehow by projectors, let alone poor handling practises.

Nevertheless, it is a real problem, that has to be overcome. Perhaps it is
best to scan them first so one always has a digital copy.  Kevin.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@ampsc.com>
To: <filmscanners@halftone.co.uk>
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2001 6:14 PM
Subject: Re: filmscanners: Cleaning slides


>
>
> Kevin Power wrote:
>
> > Can I ask members to detail the way they go about cleaning slides. In my
own
> > case, I use an aerosol spray designed for this purpose, then run cold
> > running water over them and then dry them off by using the aerosol spray
> > once more. Seems to work OK. Kevin Power.
> >
>
> I'm really beginning to wonder just what it is I'm not doing to my
> slides that everyone else is doing which makes them mine not require
> cold running water, ammonia, kim-wipes, PEC, and so on...
>
> I mean, I know B.C. is known for it's pristine water and air, but what
> exactly is it that you guys are finding all over your slides that
> requires such drastic measures?
>
> I'll admit, I have a few that have been mistreated, usually by the
> processor, and sometimes they benefit from a good rewash in warm water
> and a spot reducing agent like photoflo, but they are relatively rare
also.
>
> If I do anything, I give them a blast with compressed air, in most cases
> that's all that's needed.
>
> On a similar topic, today I saw an ad for Nikon's ED 4000 scanner, and I
> have to admit the ad is pretty impressive.  They show an image of a
> gorilla which is very dirty, dusty, scratched, badly faded and other
> wish abused.  They then show the result from the ED 4000 after
> application of ROC and ICE.  It really does look like a different image,
> color is restored and defects are gone.
>
> Art
>
> >
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@ampsc.com>
> > To: <filmscanners@halftone.co.uk>
> > Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2001 6:45 PM
> > Subject: Re: filmscanners: Cleaning slides
> >
> >
> >
> >> The reason I say eeek, is because I was a mouse in a former life, and
> >> its habit...
> >>
> >> No, really, because you're are playing with the pH of the film.
Ammonia
> >> is very base (alkaline), and I have no idea how it responds with
> >> formaldehyde hardener, etc.  I do know that I once was playing with
> >> household chemicals on some B&W prints and full strength household
> >> ammonia dissolved the emulsion right off the print.
> >>
> >> Unless I read an authoritative source that says a certain concentration
> >> of ammonia is safe for film emulsions, you'll excuse me if I run into
my
> >> hole in the wall and shiver ;-)
> >>
> >> Art
> >>
> >> Colin Maddock wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>> I use cotton bud dipped in a diluted ammonia based household
cleaner -
> >>>
> > it works wonders on the mould too.
> >
> >>>> Colin Maddock
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Art said:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>> All I can say is eeek!  stay away from my film!
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> Why do you say "eeek" Art? Needless to say, the above cleaning method
> >>
> > has no adverse effect on the film. In fact it is "squeeky clean". No
smears,
> > no marks, a scan looks perfect. These are old slides that I am talking
> > about.
> >
> >>> Colin Maddock
> >>>
> >>
> >>
>
>




 




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