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[filmscanners] Re: Digital Darkroom Computer Builders?



Bert writes:

> Can you point me to literature/web that
> details why this is so?

No.

> I am assuming that as an analogue device,
> that the electrons hitting the phosphors
> are the limiting component in determining
> colour capability ...

ALL monitors are analog devices.

CRTs have been around a lot long and are far more perfected than flat panel
displays.  As a result, they produce nicer images.  Flat panels will
probably get there, eventually, but they haven't yet, and it has been more
than two decades already.

High-bandwidth analog devices are very difficult to design and perfect.
This is why CRTs are some of the only remaining vacuum tubes still in
widespread use, and it's also why people still shoot film for photography.

> And also, what determines the number of colours
> when graphics DACs have been limited to 8
> bits per channel, have the testers been using
> specialised hardware to drive the electron
> guns to create a broader spectral test base?

Monitors accepting analog input can be driven to display any color under the
rainbow.

> Again, I can remember the same points being
> made of monitors and flashy 16 bit (655)
> depth cards way back when.

Nothing has really changed.  The CRT is still king, unfortunately.  (I'd
love to replace mine with a flat panel, but flat panels just don't provide
the image quality needed for photo work, although they are fine for just
about everything else.)

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