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Re: filmscanners: fogged film



The FAA has a regulation for the US (which is also usually honored in
Canada) that is a traveler requests "hand inspection" of camera and
film, that the carry-on luggage X-Ray security person is supposed to
grant you your request.  That usually does not require opening the
camera back.

Sometime the person will try to ignore you request, but you can always
ask to speak to a supervisor, who usually know the regulation.

Keep in mind that most airport security people who run the X-ray
machines are hired by the airlines, and have minimal training, and since
the salaries aren't great, this is not usually a "career position" and
there is a lot of change over.  I found sometimes the employee is new
and unaware of the FAA ruling.  So be firm.

Most North American X-ray machines will do minimal to no fogging of low
ISO films, but the effect is cumulative, so if the film goes through
numerous machines it will get fogged even if it is a slower film.

Lastly, once again, do not put undeveloped film into checked in luggage
as the new machines they use on checked in luggage can do great damage
to unprocessed film.

Art

Lynn Allen wrote:
> 
> Norman wrote:
> 
> >It is Kodak Max 800 film - what settings would you suggest for Vuescan?.
> While Farmers Reducer may work, I idea of a 3 hr drive to Kingston, Jamaica
> to drive around there looking for the chemical seems like the least
> preferred option.
> 
> OK, this is only a side comment and suggestion, since I'm not a pro, but
> since the shots were gotten at considerable effort, I'd strongly consider
> having them duplicated before I did anything drastic. And that would
> probably mean Kingston, or even Miami.
> 
> I'm surprised that there was X-ray fogging, unless the camera went through
> the machine with exposed film in it. I've only gotten X-ray fog once, and
> those were the circumstances. It didn't seem to affect the unexposed frames
> that remained in the canister. Since then, I either unload the film or keep
> the camera out of the X-ray machine. If they say they have to open the
> camera, then you'll wind the film back into the can, anyway...hopefully.
> 
> Best regards, not to mention good luck--LRA
> 
> >From: "Norman Quinn" <nquinn@uwimona.edu.jm>
> >Reply-To: filmscanners@halftone.co.uk
> >To: <filmscanners@halftone.co.uk>
> >Subject: Re: filmscanners: fogged film
> >Date: Sat, 14 Jul 2001 06:13:36 -0500
> >
> >
> >I think that Vuescan will obtain the maximum information available
> > > from the admittedly foggy and dense film - it's design will do that.
> >You
> > > may have to adjust the gamma and brightness settings to do so, or even
> >by
> > > adjusting the black point setting (after unchecking the "Auto black
> >point"
> > > box on the Color tab).
> >
> >It is Kodak Max 800 film - what settings would you suggest for Vuescan?.
> >While Farmers Reducer may work, I idea of a 3 hr drive to Kingston, Jamaica
> >to drive around there looking for the chemical seems like the least
> >preferred option.
> >
> >Norman Quinn
> >Discovery Bay Marine Laboratory
> >PO Box 35
> >Discovery Bay, St. Ann
> >Jamaica
> >
> >876 973 2241 phone
> >876 973 3091
> >
> 
> _________________________________________________________________
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