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[filmscanners] RE: Archiving and when to sharpen (was: Color spaces for differentpurposes)



>Another aspect of purposing, different for different destinations, is the
file format.  I've had more than one publicist and >publisher request that I
provide (email, ftp) a jpeg in preference to a tiff because of the file
size.  (For this I use a
>high/maximum quality in photoshop terms: 10 to 12.)

Although I concur with all you have said, I have to wonder if the publicist
and publisher are requesting jpeg files rather than lwz compressed TIFF
files out of force of habit, lack of knowledgabout the ability to compress
TIFFs using the lwz compression which is as good if not better than the JPG
compression  at levels 10-12, or a lack of any real concern over quality of
the file they are getting.

While jpg is the most known and common compression format on and for the web
and may even be necessary if you are sending the file as an email
attachment, to achieve that usefulness on the web or as an email attchment
it is often necessary to use compression levels of 5 or less which really
tends to loss a lot of data and information.  However, for FTPing, it
usually is not a necessity to reduce the file sizes to very small levels
since most of the publishers and publicists generally have some sort of
direct high speed connection to the internet and relatively large server
space to store downloading files, as well as a desire to get maximum quality
files.

-----Original Message-----
From: filmscanners_owner@halftone.co.uk
[mailto:filmscanners_owner@halftone.co.uk]On Behalf Of Bob Shomler
Sent: Sunday, June 09, 2002 12:28 PM
To: laurie@advancenet.net
Subject: [filmscanners] Archiving and when to sharpen (was: Color spaces
for differentpurposes)


>Sharpness cannot be restored, it can only be simulated.  Sharpening causes
>deterioration in image quality, so it should be avoided until the image is
>about to be prepared for a specific use.  I archive all my images without
>sharpening.

Agree.  This is how I do mine.  I'll do all the crop, tonal and other
adjustments -- except resizing -- and archive that photoshop psd file (and
the original vuescan raw scan file).  Then for specific "purposing" I'll
resize or resample as appropriate and sharpen as a last step before sending
file to its destination.  As this discussion has pointed out, the specific
actions for purposing will be different depending on the use and
destination.  Even sharpening: some places will do their own sharpening (as
mentioned).  If I know this then I'll only lightly sharpen edges (a first
stage of a two pass sharpening process, described in a Creativepro article
by Bruce Fraser at
<www.creativepro.com/story/feature/12189.html?origin=story>).  This article
addresses one of the discussion items of this thread here: in Fraser's words
"one of the important questions about sharpening: When in the image-editing
process should you sharpen?"

Another aspect of purposing, different for different destinations, is the
file format.  I've had more than one publicist and publisher request that I
provide (email, ftp) a jpeg in preference to a tiff because of the file
size.  (For this I use a high/maximum quality in photoshop terms: 10 to 12.)

--
Bob Shomler
http://www.shomler.com/

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