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[filmscanners] RE: Printing and color management



> Printers and monitors have different "gamuts" that is color ranges
> they can reproduce. Also monitors emit light, while prints reflect
> light. This basic differrence means that it is hard to compare colors
> on screen and paper.

Correct.  Printers and monitors also have different color spaces as well as
ranges and transmissive and reflective qualities; printers use CYMK color
spaces and monitors use RGB color spaces.

> As far as I can understand there are a couple of advantages of using
> managed color for nonprofessionals.
>
> 1) Consistency
> 2) Correct colors in images, not distorted by monitor settings

You might also add that for those who want to share image files with others
(who are on color managed systems using calibrated monitors, it allows
everyone to get the same output - a type of consistency but different than
the sort of consistency one talks about within a specific system where one
is doing one's own printing and not sharing files per se.

> I'm using Picture Window Pro (www.dl-c.com) as image manipulation
> program, which gives me more setting than Adobe Photo Shop Elements.
> In PWP you can assign a proofing profile, so it can simulate what the
> picture will look like when printed. I won't say that this preview is
> entirely correct, but it certainly gives a hint of the cahnges
> introduced when printing. If using "lcms" color engine PWP will also
> be able to show which colors are out of gamut, this option is not
> available with the Windows color engine.

Cannot speak for Photoshop Elements since I use Photoshop CS, but the full
Photoshop does offer all the settings you speak of and also "soft proofing"
which is the name for "a proofing profile, so it can simulate what the
picture will look like when printed."  Photoshop also shows what is "out of
gamut" and is available for windows.  I do not know Picture Window Pro; but
I am sure that there are some less expensive consumer image editing programs
out there which also furnish all or most of the features that you speak of
and do it for windows.

filmscanners_owner@halftone.co.uk wrote:
> Subject: [filmscanners] Printing and color management
>
>
> Hi!
>
> I just tought about writing down some thoughts about printing and
> color.
>
> Printers and monitors have different "gamuts" that is color ranges
> they can reproduce. Also monitors emit light, while prints reflect
> light. This basic differrence means that it is hard to compare colors
> on screen and paper.
>
> As far as I can understand there are a couple of advantages of using
> managed color for nonprofessionals.
>
> 1) Consistency
> 2) Correct colors in images, not distorted by monitor settings
>
> I'm using Picture Window Pro (www.dl-c.com) as image manipulation
> program, which gives me more setting than Adobe Photo Shop Elements.
> In PWP you can assign a proofing profile, so it can simulate what the
> picture will look like when printed. I won't say that this preview is
> entirely correct, but it certainly gives a hint of the cahnges
> introduced when printing. If using "lcms" color engine PWP will also
> be able to show which colors are out of gamut, this option is not
> available with the Windows color engine.
>
> Here is what I'm doing when printing, on my Canon i9950.
>
> 1) Choose printer setting
> 2) Go into manual
> 3) Leave everything as default (as I use original profiles)
> 4) In PWP:s printer dialog I set the printer profile that came with
> my printer for the paper I'm using.
> 5) Print
>
> This works pretty good for me.
>
> Regards
>
> Erik
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