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[filmscanners] RE: DSLRs, film scans and color (was: is this about as good asitgets?)



> From: michael shaffer
>
>   I would have thought as much ... but, aside from the characteristics of
> some Dcams versus better Dcams, why are untagged JPEGs no better than
> sRGB???  That is, if you open them into PS, and then assign any variety of
> working spaces, the gamuts which "look best" are associated with
> Colormatch
> and sRGB(???)

Probably because they assume that most of their customers will view the
images uncorrected on a monitor with a narrow gamut, and they don't want
them to look undersaturated. If there are any colors that are more
saturated, they just chop them off at the boundaries of sRGB.

My DiMage 7 produces images with a much winder gamut. Indeed, if you look at
the gamut of the profile that defines the camera's native color space, it's
much larger than the human eye can see in some directions (albeit rather
small in the reds). This doesn't mean that it actually captures colors that
the eye can't see--by definition, there's no such thing as a color that the
eye can't see, because color is a measure of perception, not light. All it
means is that, for instance, pure blue light stimulates the red and green
sensors to some extent, so an RGB value of 0,0,255 will never appear in the
image. The profile tells it how much blue to subtract from the red and green
in order to compensate.

--

Ciao,               Paul D. DeRocco
Paul                mailto:pderocco@ix.netcom.com


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