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[filmscanners] Re: [filmscanners_Digest] filmscanners Digest forFri 4 Apr, 2003



Hey, I just happend to see this message.

Whatever lightsource in a scanner, you must take in account how good the
diffusion of the light is.
That is, in Minolta the cold cathode diffuse bulb is reflected in a mirror,
still having the diffusion of the bulb.
Nikon 8000 has light diodes and a diffuser.
What counts is how diffused light is when it reaches the film!
What cold cathode bulb scanners might miss is a diffuser to control the
diffusion of the light.
Minolta *do have* a diffuse light, but not enought.
That is, they missed a correcting diffuser.

After some heavy experimenting I'm sure in the future we will controlled
diffused light,
because each film has it's own optmal requirment of diffused light.
Not only for B/W, Dia and negative film but also for different types of film
of each cathegory.


May Saddam soon be *totaly* diffused!
Have a nice day!

Sorry for my English!

Fiat Lux!
Bo Wrangborg

----- Original Message -----
From: "Arthur Entlich" <artistic-1@shaw.ca>
To: <bo@visicon.se>
Sent: Friday, April 04, 2003 1:25 PM
Subject: [filmscanners] Re: [filmscanners_Digest] filmscanners Digest forFri
4 Apr, 2003


> Hi Barry,
>
> I would suggest that full quoting is not often required, and can
> sometimes prove excessive.  I usually suggest people quote enough of the
> original that the reader knows the references.
>
> According to Canon the scanner uses: Cold cathode mercury fluorescent lamp
>
> This would tend to be a diffused light source, but as I posted earlier,
> Minolta also used such a lighting source but somehow manages to make it
> overly directional, perhaps through the use of some condenser lenses???
>
> I do not recall the FS4000 being saddled with a reputation for excessive
>   grain or scratches when FARE is not used.  It's main problems are with
> the speed it scans and shadow noise.
>
> Art
>
>
>
> barry wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > Thanks Art
> >
> >
> > Is the Canon FS4000 the cold cathode tube type?. I do not remember the
specs
> > of the scanners I looked at (briefly) indicating the type of light
source is
> > used. Is the Nikon the only one to use a collimated light source?
> >
> > regards
> >
> > Barry T
> >
> >
>
> > From: Arthur Entlich <artistic-1@shaw.ca>
> > ----------------------------------------
> > Hi Barry,
> >
> > The answer is "it is, and it does".
> >
> >
> > It is like the condenser versus diffusion debate (almost exactly), and
> > it does make a difference.
> >
> > Overall cold cathode tubes lighting provides a diffuse light source.
> > The exception appears to be Minolta scanners, which seem to need an
> > auxiliary defuser.  And in fact, that scanner series may be the perfect
> > example of the problem.
>
> [...]
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
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