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Re: filmscanners: Best digital archive medium for scans?




----- Original Message -----
From: "Arthur Entlich" <artistic@ampsc.com>
To: <filmscanners@halftone.co.uk>
Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2001 11:05 AM
Subject: Re: filmscanners: Best digital archive medium for scans?


> Not to be a smart @ss, but how about film?
>
> I don't know that any of the current storage media will either be around
> or will survive 20 plus years from now.
>

Also, not wishing to be a smart @ss, how many people still have record
players ? It's 17 years (I think) since CD first arrived and I suspect I
would have to go to London to buy new vynyl. They isn't an awful lot
available when you get there either. Being a nation of Audio freaks there
are still quite a few specialist retailers who will sell you a deck, but the
numbers are dwindling.

I suspect film use will be minimal in 20 years. You will still be able to
get a scanner so do I think film is a good backup for failed CDs. Scanners
in 20 years may in fact get more off the film despite some deterioration.

What we all need to keep in mind is whatever we use to archive our digital
files is that we need to check the data periodically and transfer to new
technologies as these come available AND keep separate backup systems.

I am using 2 different brands of CDs with a copy on each one in Sussex one
in Yorkshire (250 miles away - although separate buildings should generally
be sufficient). I also have the slides to fall back on. I  haven't as yet
checked the CD's since recording but every few years you should check they
are OK. Hopefully any problems discovered early can be recovered from the
other copy, using a better reader or by a specialist company.

Your data should be stored in as controlled an environment as you can
reasonably manage. Mine are in the middle of the house under the stairs
where there is least change in temperature and indeed air in general. There
are no nearby electrical or magnetic equipment of any kind.

As technology becomes obsolete you should transfer to new formats and media.
This is usually not as painful as it sounds as the new technology is usually
much cheaper, faster and has much greater capacity.

Steve




 




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