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Re: filmscanners: Grain, Noise, et al



Norman wrote:

>>From a practical, rather than a causative approach, how have folks dealt 
>>with this issue, both in terms of minimizing apparent grain from scans and 
>>in improving (ie: reducing) the appearance of 'grain' in Photoshop?

Norman, your defocussing scheme is undoubtably the fastest way to reduce 
grain, although you pay a penalty (but surprisingly slight) in sharpness. 
Some of us (notably Maris) have found that separating the photo into its RGB 
components, blurring the Blue "mask", and then recombining them eliminates 
much of the grain with almost no obvious loss of detail. On occassion, I've 
had to blur *all three* components by varying amounts--which of course 
brings it back around toward the original concept of defocusing, with much 
more time spent but slightly better control.

With Picture Publisher 8 I've been able to isolate grain and/or noise pixels 
and change their color closer to what it's supposed to be, but have never 
been able to pull that trick off with Photoshop. Maybe someone else has 
figured out how that's done in PS. ?

Best regards--LRA



>From: "Norman Unsworth" <unsworth_norman@aclink.org>
>Reply-To: filmscanners@halftone.co.uk
>To: <filmscanners@halftone.co.uk>
>Subject: filmscanners: Grain, Noise, et al
>Date: Fri, 13 Jul 2001 10:26:39 -0400
>
>I wanted to seek the input of list participants into the question of
>minimizing grain and noise in 35mm scans. While it varies according to
>subject matter, predominant color, film type and speed, all scans seem to
>have some degree of grain / noise not found in the prints. I've used both
>Vuescan's ability to manually focus (actually, slightly out of focus) and
>grain reduction to reduce what I'm calling grain but obviously there are
>drawbacks in the form of reduction of sharpness, in either of these
>solutions.
>
>By way of background, I use a Minolta Scan Dual II, with Vuescan and I
>always scan at the maximum resolution (2820, I believe), usually 48 bit.
>Color and film settings I vary depending upon what will get me the 'best'
>scan.
>
>From a practical, rather than a causative approach, how have folks dealt
>with this issue, both in terms of minimizing apparent grain from scans and
>in improving (ie: reducing) the appearance of 'grain' in Photoshop?
>
>Norm Unsworth, Owner
>Clark Systems Custom Golf: Outstanding Quality and Value in Custom Golf
>Equipment
>609 641 5712
>Please send email to me at: clarksystems@earthlink.net
>Visit our Web Site at http://home.earthlink.net/~clarksystems
>

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