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RE: filmscanners: Large collection - full frame projection via DLP & PowerPoint



>I would think that a digital camera with Macro and Zoom capabilities on a
>copy stand would do a great job on the flat copy. Obviously lighting would
>have to be balanced for color and glare to get the best results.

With traditional film based copy set-up, one can use polarizing filtration
(single and double polarization) and several other lighting and filtering
techniques to handle various problems which come up when copying flat art
such as shadows cast by textured papers, glare when you need to put the
original under glass, silvering out problems on b&w prints, etc.  One can
also use a variety of film types ( especially if your set-up uses a large
format camera) to deal with factors such as increased or decreased contrast
in the original and the like.

Question:  How do digital cameras in a copy set-up work with things like 1)
single and double polarization of lenses and/or lights or of both; 2) the
use of color correction filtration over the lens or over the lights when
copying reflective originals in both b&w and color; 3) the use of grazing
side lighting to bring out texture in original artwork - like oil
paintings - where it is important to show it; and 4) the use of contrasty
lighting as opposed to soft flat lighting of the subject?

Has anyone explored these things? I haven't because I do not own a digital
camera; but I am interested for possible future use when considering the
purchase of a digital camera.

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-filmscanners@halftone.co.uk
[mailto:owner-filmscanners@halftone.co.uk]On Behalf Of Ira Beckoff
Sent: Monday, May 28, 2001 10:20 AM
To: filmscanners@halftone.co.uk
Subject: Re: filmscanners: Large collection - full frame projection via
DLP & PowerPoint


I would think that a digital camera with Macro and Zoom capabilities on a
copy stand would do a great job on the flat copy. Obviously lighting would
have to be balanced for color and glare to get the best results.
One of the cameras with an LCD viewfinder that rotates off the lens axis
 like the Nikon 990 etc. would work.
I think it is also possible to set up the camera to preview to a monitor.
I don't have a specific camera to suggest but in the days when I did
film/slide presentations we would have loved such a setup.

The negatives and transparencies are another issue. Although I believe some
users have had success with a similiar setup to the above and shooting down
through the film into a light box. But the quality will not be as good as a
film scanner.
Ira

Ira Beckoff
imbeck@adelphia.net
----- Original Message -----
From: "Marvin Demuth" <mdemuth@polobeam.net>
To: <filmscanners@halftone.co.uk>
Sent: Monday, May 28, 2001 8:57 AM
Subject: filmscanners: Large collection - full frame projection via DLP &
PowerPoint


> My current project is to take a large collection of multi-format negatives
> and transparencies (35mm to 4x5), b&w color prints (billfold to 8x10) to
> scan them into JPEG for insertion into PowerPoint 2000 slides for full
> frame projection via DLP (Digital Light Processing) at 600x800 pixels.
>
> I have started with the flat art and have found the process slower than I
> would like for it to be.
>
> I love the concept of looking through a 35mm single lens reflex finder,
> composing the photo, exposing the photo and then quickly moving to the
next
> subject.  Is there any scanning process that accommodates this approach?
>
> Any one have ideas as to ways to approach this project?  Has any one
> handled a large project of this type?  If so, how did you approach the
project?
>
> Marvin Demuth
>




 




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