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[filmscanners] RE: keeping the 16bit scans



Paul,
Funny noises are not always a good warning for many of us.  There are funny
noises and then there are funny noises if you know what I mean.  Some random
funny noises can give pause and make one nervious; but they turn out to be
harmless although unusual.  Others take place regularly with no problem
surfacing for a long time and then all of a sudden the hard drive starts
failing.  I have had several hard drives that have just up and dies on me
without a wimper.  When I have had meaningful funny noises it has been a
clicking noise and is associated with one partiular type of problem but
there are other sources of failure that have no noises associated with them
in my experience.

But you are right both can go bad.  I have never had a CD that has been
sucessfully written go bad on me later for reasons other than a physical
cause like embedded dirt, a scratch or gouge, or a bad paper label or stray
adhesive on the CD.  I have had CD platters that were bad from the very
start and could not be successfully written to from the get go.

-----Original Message-----
From: filmscanners_owner@halftone.co.uk
[mailto:filmscanners_owner@halftone.co.uk]On Behalf Of Paul D. DeRocco
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2003 9:11 PM
To: laurie@advancenet.net
Subject: [filmscanners] RE: keeping the 16bit scans


> From: Frank Paris
>
> I agree with this. I've never seen a CD go bad, but you've got to expect
> that hard disks will go bad in a couple years on average, if you keep
> them spinning 24/7 like I do. If you shut your machine down when you're
> not using it, they should last five years, even the new ones that are
> only guaranteed for a year. They are, however, so cheap now that I'd
> rather reduce the probability of electrical spikes trashing my
> electronics by switching it on and off several times a day (that can
> also wipe out all your disks, as my son found out) and keep my disks
> spinning all the time. Since I mirror, if one goes bad, I just replace
> it and I haven't lost any data.

I find that hard disks can go bad, and so can CDs. However, you don't know a
CD is bad until you try to read it and it fails. But with HDs, all the
failures I've seen have warned by making funny noises first. So what I do is
keep two big disks in two machines, and run frequent backups across the
network.

As to average lifetime, HDs usually last until I want to replace them with
something 2x bigger anyway.

--

Ciao,               Paul D. DeRocco
Paul                mailto:pderocco@ix.netcom.com

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