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[filmscanners] RE: keeping the 16bit scans



See my reply to Robert Meier.

>As for CDs, the "hassle factor" is the amount of checking in future plus
>tracking disks.

If you are talking about monitoring the CDs/DVDs  for such things in the
future as deterioration or drop outs, etc., I agree this can be a hassle but
it is also a hassle to have to do it with Hard drives as well - especially
if you are using them in the way you suggested.  You also need to monitor
your tapes to see that they do not deteriorate, become unreadable, acquire
magnetic distortions and dropouts, become dried out or get attacked by
funguses.  So any way you cut it you will be faced with the hassle of
monitoring your archival media.  There is no free lunch.  This is what
museums, collectors, galleries, and libraries have to do on a continuous
basis with their archives in addition to the hassle of updating the media to
fit the newest technologies on a regular basis (i.e, transfers from floppys
to tapes to cds to DVDs to whatever. Media become obsolete and unreadable as
the technology advances and the old technologies that were used to read them
cease to exist any longer.

There are horror stories about everything and everything is a risk.  As for
two copies of each cd, I fail to see how this is any different than
maintaining two mirrored hard drives which as I see it is two copies of
everything.  Archives are living things; they are constantly expanding and
acquiring more and additional contents.  You will have to constantly be
indexing and tracking files, reorganizing indexes and media, copying and
moving files as your archive grows and expands, as your goals, needs, and
objectives demand, and as technology changes no matter what media or method
you select.  So there will always be a hassle factor of basically the same
proportions and dimensions no matter what you do.

-----Original Message-----
From: filmscanners_owner@halftone.co.uk
[mailto:filmscanners_owner@halftone.co.uk]On Behalf Of Ed Verkaik
Sent: Friday, March 28, 2003 4:08 PM
To: laurie@advancenet.net
Subject: [filmscanners] Re: keeping the 16bit scans


From: "Laurie Solomon" <laurie@advancenet.net>
> If you are speaking primarily of a non RAID array where the mirrored
drives are achieved by copying files from one hard drive to another
manually, I fail to see how that is less hassle than burning CDs.  But
in the end it is your decision; I just think that you should investigate
and think out in more detail your plans to use mirrored removable drives
before discarding the notion of using CDs.

Laurie,

Yes, you make valid points about proprietary setups like RAID, but I was
thinking of two drives where I use simple software to make the second
copy. For images, nothing fancy is needed. I would leave one drive
attached for convenience and store the other off-site or in a safe,
fireproof spot as my backup, then switch them regularly.

As for CDs, the "hassle factor" is the amount of checking in future plus
tracking disks. Too many separate little pieces for my taste! I know
they're cheap and fairly reliable BUT I have heard enough horrot stories
to be seriously spooked to make that my only archiving method (and
requiring 2 copies no less).  I also have a Travan tape drive for 20Gb
tapes as an alternative.

EdV


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